One of our dinosaurs is missing!

One of our dinosaurs is missing is what I was thinking when Paul and I went to Marqueyssac Gardens last week for their Grand 20th Anniversary open day. As garden ornaments go, having your own dinosaur is very OTT. Could we find a dinosaur… no… and we looked everywhere. I thought that it would be lurking behind one of the many high bushes in the garden, like the dinosaur that I remember in the Natural History Museum in London. I turned a corner in the museum to be face to face with a dinosaur. Lets just say that I was making more noise than the dinosaur exhibit.
 

The gardens are magnificentI must say that the gardens are magnificent, the views of the Dordogne valley are wonderful and well worth a visit or two.
 

rosemary in lavender.Above is a favourite on our walk through the gardens, the curling rosemary hedge in a bed of lavender.
 

Tree HouseThis is just one of the hands on displays that are new to Marqueyssac this year, the double tree house.
 

Play TimeAlong the “Esplanade” were new musical animations designed and constructed by Alfred de la Neuche for children of all ages to play with, (including myself).
 

Tree ClimbingWe were informed that we could have a go at shimmying up the ropes to the top of the tallest tree for a breath taking view over the valley, and even after reassurances that it was easy we said ‘no thank you, we will watch you’.
 

flowers and perfumeThis bicycle train looked like old style bird cages, they were full of flowers and perfume.
 

in the ChâteauI love this room in the Château from the wallpaper to the furniture gorgeous.
 

 peacockStill looking for “dino” we spotted this peacock, what magnificent plumage.

After looking everywhere Paul and I decided to ask in the gift shop. It turns out that we were too early for the unavailing of the dinosaur which would take place in the late afternoon.

An Allosaurus named KanThe above was as close as we came. No problem, we shall have another visit in a few months time to see a 7.5 metre long and 2.5 metres high, 150 million years old Allosaurus named Kan.
 

Other events at Marqueyssac will be the Great Easter Egg Hunt on Easter Sunday and Monday, where eggs will be hidden around the gardens.

Curious about Nature? Arts and Crafts workshops, creating animal masks, mobiles and dolls. During Easter and All Saints Day, plus every weekend during the school holidays in the months of May and June.
 
 

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Les Jardins Suspendus de Marqueyssac

Part Three

This section is on the Château, aviary and gift shop.

The Château was built in the 17th century by Bertrand Vernet de Marqueyssac, counsellor to Louis XIV. It has been under restoration since 1996. Although there is a great deal of work to do and much of the interior cannot be seen, the rooms available are very beautiful and so is the outside, and therefore along with everything else it is still worth a visit.

This is the view of the impressive Château that you get when you first enter the estate

Le château

Le château

The bedroom is gorgeous, “Can I have a bedroom like this one Paul?”

la chambre

La chambre

I would love this dinning room too.

La salle à manger

La salle à manger

A close up of just one of the many white doves in the aviary

The aviary

The aviary

I really must return to the gift shop for one or two of these gorgeous antique style jars.

Glassware, one of the displays in the gift shop

Glassware, one of the displays in the gift shop

Les Jardins Suspendus de Marqueyssac

Part Two

 
On all saints Day 19th October to 3rd November 2013: there will be ‘acrobatic’ races on the cliff side, plus an arts and crafts workshop and ‘curious about nature’ wood turning.
 

In 1860 Julien de Cervel began to plant thousands of boxwood trees and carved them (with help) into fabulous shapes, according to the Italian style at that time. However, in the second half of the twentieth century the garden and château fell into a state of disrepair. This was remedied by the new owner, Kleber Rossillon, who in 1966 began restoring the gardens and Château to their former glory. He has also added a few interesting features, the rosemary garden and the water fall from the fabulous belvedere (balcony high above the river).
In 1997, the gardens were classified amongst the Notable Gardens of France by the Committee of Parks and Gardens of the French Ministry of Culture.

These boxwood trees just look like they are tumbling down the side of the bank.

tumbling boxwood's

tumbling boxwood’s

This is one of my favourite places to visit. The swirling rosemary which is surrounded by lavender, the smell is wonderful.

Rosemary garden

Rosemary garden

Truly a work of art

Artistic cut

Artistic cut

A view across the Dordogne to my favourite castle-Castlenaud.

The neighbours place

The neighbours place

An avenue amongst the six kilometres of shaded path, the shade is very welcome on a hot day.

Shady walks

Shady walks

The last picture of the garden is Paul taking in the wonderful view over La Rogue-Gageac from outside the cabane en pierre sèche, (dry stone hut). The bell roof of stone is a work of genius, constructed entirely by hand each stone is fitted together without mortar to form the bell shape

Viewing the view

Viewing the view

Les Jardins Suspendus de Marqueyssac

Part One

Marqeyssac is a listed site in Vézac, it is a privately owned estate with six kilometres of shaded paths bordered by 150,000 hand pruned box trees a hundred years old, which are embellished with belvederes, gorgeous waterfalls, rockeries and grassy clearings.
The belvedere, at 192 meters above the river gives exceptional views of the Dordogne valley. It also has an aviary, children’s area, workshops for wood turning, gift shop, a nice café with exceptional views over the Dordogne valley and in eveinings of the months of July and August candlelit walks. It is open to the public from April to November and is well worth a visit.

Our first trip to the gardens in 2009 was not planned but we thought after seeing the road sign to the Marqueyssac that it would be lovely to wander around the gardens for half an hour and have lunch there, take a few photographs then go on to our destination.
Au contraire. Looking at the manicured clipped hedges and the swirling rosemary garden, it was love at first sight. Miles of paths took us through fifty-four acres of forested, sculptured and flowering parkland dotted with the occasional waterfall and views to die for. From this elevated position you can see Beynac, Château de Feynac and Château de Castlenaud at one end and the riverside village of Le Roque Gageac from the other.

On our second visit we walked along the paths which led us around the estate and to the belvederes, a balcony hanging192 meters above the ground, with more exceptional views over the river. Ultimately, the paths returned to the Château and its outdoor café. We sat at the café, facing the distant Château de Beynac and savoured the wonderful luncheon as well as the views and the peacocks who would walk up and down looking for any crumbs.

So this is part one with the ‘view’ and the café, part two is the garden and three will be the Château, aviary and gift shop.

Beynac, what a view.

Beynac, what a view.

One of the male peacocks looking for crumbs, he is gorgeous

One of the male peacocks looking for crumbs, he is gorgeous

A close up showing of the magnificent colours of the peacock

A close up showing of the magnificent colours of the peacock

This is a picture of Adams dessert, I could just eat it now.

This is a picture of Adams dessert, I could just eat it now.

Paul’s sorbet, so refreshing on a hot day.

Paul’s sorbet, so refreshing on a hot day.

A last look at the stunning view.

A last look at the stunning view.

A truly magical place high above the Dordogne. We must return again and again.

Part two-the garden next week…