Club de I’Amite Meal At Le Tourepique.

Yesterday was the Generations Movement, Club de I’Amite Daglanaise Autumn Meal. Where we all come together to enjoy each others convivial company while appreciating delicious food which is of course accompanied by a few glasses of wine.

At Le Tournepique restaurant in Castelnaud-la-Chapelle you can enjoy excellent Perigordian or Basque food. Or a taste of both. They have set menus or a selection of à la carte foods of a wide variety to tempt everyone’s palate. The Restaurant is situated on the bridge at Castlenaud overlooking the Dordogne River, below the Medieval Château.

We have eaten at Le Tournepique often and can highly recommend it for the excellent food and service. Not forgetting the terrific views of the River Dordogne. They also cater for Vegetarian or Gluten Free eaters.

Menu
For the Meat Eaters.
Kir
Soup Maison (pumpkin and chestnut soup deliciously spiced)
Terrine De Foie Gras
Roti De Veau sauce cepes with Pommes Sautees
Coupe De Glaces Aux Pommes (et Alcool De Pommes) – very delicious.
Cafe
Vins – Rouge ou Rose

For Vegetarian
Kir
Soup – same as above
Courgette salad with a gorgeous vinaigrette and walnuts dressing.
Fish cooked in a cream and white wine sauce encased in a delicious herb omelette.
Dessert – same as above
Cafe.
Vins – Rouge ou Rose.

Paul, enjoying the conversation while waiting for his soup course.
 

Looking good but where is George Clooney!
 

Bon Appétit Ladies.
 

Our Maire in deep conversation. I love the gentleman on the left facial expression and the witches hat in the background of the picture.
 

Wonderful seeing you looking so well Roy.
 

“Yours will be on the table in one minute”. Eyes down and enjoy.
 

Enjoying the alcoholic dessert. I must say thank you so much to our friend sitting beside me for being so patient in trying to teaching Paul and I to speak French over the Spring and Summer months.
 
 

Events:-
Halloween 31st October
All Saints Day 1st November
 
 

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To the Woods

Yesterday was Paul’s first mushroom foraging expedition into the forests that surround this area. Guided by two French experts off he went for a few hours.

A couple of lessons Paul leaned right at the start was, carry a stick for foraging and don’t touch the mushrooms until you are sure of what they are. There are many varieties of mushrooms in this particular area, some of which are ‘do not touch’, some are simply not edible and some are not tasty but, there are some that are delicious. So it is good to have an expert or two at your disposal to sort the good from the bad. If in doubt you can take your picked mushrooms to a pharmacy and they will tell you if they are safe to eat or not.

“Come on Paul catch up”.
 

They did not find any edible mushrooms in the forest but I am glad to say that he came home with a few field mushrooms which we will eat later today. Hopefully on the next visit he will be able to pick Girolle, Ceps or even Faux Mousseron (Fairy Ring) Champignon.
 

However, Paul did find lots of chestnuts which according to one of our foraging experts are excellent served with salmon. I must try that, it sounds delicious.
 
 

The Season Of Mist And Mellow Horses!

Since we moved to live in France we notice the seasons far more than we did in England. We used to live in a fairly large coastal town with little in the way of nature.

Here in Daglan nature is all around us and once again the seasonal changes in and around the village are magnificent. Autumn is here in full and colourful glory and with it come the mist’s of October mornings.

Taken from the graveyard overlooking Daglan as the mist rises to greet the sun over the forest.
 
Golden trees at the rear of the graveyard are just stunning.
 

These deep reds were photographed as Paul and I walked along the lane towards the river Ceou at the side of the Château.
 

The forest in all its glory.
 

I could not believe my eyes, crocuses in bloom!
 

I Just had to stop for a chat.
 

Or two. So gentle and relaxed, magnificent horses. Just what I needed to ease a stressful day.
 

The Château grounds as the sun slowly penetrates through the trees early yesterday morning.
 
 

Event:-Sarlat 21st October, Grande Brocante d’automne. Place de la Grande Rigaudie from eight in the morning.
 
 

“The Envy Of The Whole World”.

This is how President Emmanuel Macron described the French baguette earlier this year when he backed calls to have it listed as a UNESCO cultural treasure.

Intrigued and delighted by this, I just had to find out more information about the baguette, why that shape, how did it become so popular in every corner of France, in short what is the history of the tradition French Baguette.

Delicious.

 

Starting around the 14th and 15th century people had to use a Communal oven to bake their bread, which was mostly round in shape. However, even though they were called Communal they did not belong to the Community. The oven was the property of the local Lord or the Church who would charge the surfs for baking their bread. Following the French Revolution, the ovens became the property of the village; no more fees.

 

Once a week the oven was fired up and the locals would carry the dough they had prepared at home to the oven. Each family would mark the top of the bread with a distinctive cut to distinguish their bread from the other families.

 

The ash created during the baking was collected, mixed with water and used for the laundry.

Baguette’s really took off in the 1920’s after a new law prevented workers starting work before 4am. In older to get the bread baked in time for breakfast, bakers started to make long, thin ‘wand”s of bread. Although the dough at that time was still made at home and then taken to the Boulangerie to bake.

 

Bread oven’s can be seen all over France in the Boulangerie, or in the centre of the village, in the grounds of a property or in the property itself.

So if you are looking for a new home …

 
 

Event:-Le château de Castlenaud celebrates the European Heritage Weekend on the 15th and 16th September with a Medieval Fencing Tournament.
 
 

Just for Monsieur Poirot!

Imagine the scene, Monsieur Poirot boarding the Orient Express and in his luggage was the above case all ready for his moustache preparation that evening.
This was my greatest find at the Brocante at La Rogue-Geanac this morning a Vintage and rare but sadly empty kit by Marcel Rochas. Which originally held three bottles containing cologne for Monsieur.

“Anytime you slip on a sleeveless bustier or slide your hands into your skirt pockets, send a silent thanks to the late fashion designer Marcel Rochas”, (Sophie Rochas 2015).

In the ‘40s and ‘50s, Rochas pioneered such silhouettes and helped define that “je ne sais quoi” of French glamour. During his 30-year career, which began with perfume, Rochas dressed the Duchess of Windsor, Marlene Dietrich and Mae West.
 

“Hold me back”, I found another linen stall.
 

The morning shadows are getting longer but it is still a gorgeous view any time of the year.
 

Paul jokingly asked the stone mason if he started with a large block and it got reduced to the items at the front of the stall. A hearty laugh was the response.
 

I loved this vintage cart. You can imagine it full of gorgeous flowers.
 

Browsing complete, in need of a treat… hot chocolate with cream.
 

Here is my version of a moustache, delicious.