A Pomegranate Tree and ZZ Tops!

A rare combination I know, but wow, a pomegranate tree fruiting in The Place de la Liberte, I have never seen a pomegranate tree before. Yes, I really must get out more.

Looking truly delicious.
 

Sunday morning market in Daglan
Full of tempting delights. I can highly recommend the goats cheese.
 

Vide Grenier (empty attic)
I am still looking for a suitable box for my embroidery silks. The Vide Grenier in Daglan gave me a chance to continue my search, I did find one box but it was just too big, will keep on looking.
 

“Just need to tidy up then I am ready”.
 

This vendors magnificent beard reminded me of ZZ Tops. His stall displayed the most amazing coffee grinders and an antique Chinese vase.
 

We are very sorry that we could not attend the musical evening last night, hoping that everyone had a brilliant time.

The 8 à Huit Supermarket in Daglan will be closed from the 1st to the 8th October.
 
 

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New Happenings in Daglan.

A few years ago you could not buy any vegetarian products in France. Well slightly not true, you could buy the freshest vegetables you have ever tasted, picked that morning to sell at the market. However, tofu or soya etc was not to be found. Even restaurants gave me a sympathetic ‘poor thing’ response when I said that I was vegetarian. With one response saying that they would “take the meat out of the soup”!

In more recent times things have changed for the better. Now you can order vegetarian meals in most restaurants and you can buy vegetarian products right here at the 8 à Huit in Daglan. Tofu and BIO foods, absolutely brilliant.
 

Here you can see more of the range of products on offer. Do come and try out a few.
 

Chris and Virginie are always there to help.
 

They also sell a good range of wines too and are open from eight in the morning to eight at night during the summer season.
 

Daglan is in full bloom and more and more planting is taking place.
 

Gorgeous, well done.
 

Last but not least a wonderful new jewellery stall has appeared in the Daglan Sunday market.

Superb jewellery made from Capim Dourado ( Brazilian for golden grass). The plant which is transformed into such gorgeous jewellery is indigenous to the central region of Cerrado in Brazil and is only harvested from the end of September to the end of November.

Capim Dourado, with its sustainable and environmentally friendly growing and harvesting is the main source of income for the Xerente ethnic group of people that live in the area.

In order to import these golden jewels a partnership was developed directly with the local artisans. So that the entire collection’s origin is certified, all of the jewellery is handmade in Jalapao to the strict regulations of the area.

The only material used in the collection is the ‘golden grass’, with gold-plated mounts in order to keep the jeweller’s quality. Which is amazing and so light. I particularly like the ear rings and the bracelets.
 
 

Events:-

Free Rock Concert on the 21st June at La Roque-Gageac from 7pm in the village.

Fête de la Music begins 21st June in Sarlat.

Sports Day from 9am, hiking, football, archery, paintball and a bouncy castle on the 24th June at Vitrac.
 
 

Market Day in Daglan.

Our Sunday market in Daglan is expanding as we approach Summer. Slowly at first with an extra stall or two, growing to what you can see today, with more to follow over the next few weeks.

Wine of course is year round unless the weather is pretty horrible and the vegetable stall is a regular weekly visitor.

I do love it when the flower stall appears gingerly at first with a few hardy plants. Then ‘wow’ a burst of colour which always sends me running from our home to purchase bedding plants.

Today was no exception I just had to get more plants.
 

Here is a new stall selling ladies and men’s wear. Gorgeous cotton and linen, plus t-shirts in a variety of colours.
 

Only a short blog today a larger blog to follow.
 
 

Gabarres at La Rogue-Gageac

It is dismal grey and pouring with rain outside so I thought that a little sunshine was needed to brighten up the day. If anyone is planning to holiday in the Perigord this Spring, Summer or early Autumn. One of the places that you need to visit is La Rogue-Gageac. What better way is there on a warm and sunny day than to travel down the Dordogne River on one of the gabarres which are moored at La Rogue-Gageac. Gabarres are traditional flat bottom boats which were used to transport merchandise down the river.

Just close your eyes and picture yourself relaxing down stream with a cool breeze in your face on a sunny day with blue sky’s above. To add to your enjoyment you can either listen to a commentary in French or use one of the supplied headsets programmed for your language. We opted for the headphones this time. The commentary is told in the form of one of the men working the gabarres in the 18C which is informative while being entertaining at the same time.

Inland water transport expanded rapidly in the 18C and to meet this demand boats were built with flat bottoms because the water level was so low in the Summer months. Traffic was so dense along the Dordogne River that by 1860 there were 571 gabarres.

You get a good view of the shops and restaurants as you pass by.

Quite a few of the gabarres on this part of the river were only one way, going down stream with their cargo and then dismantled on arrival at their destination and cut up for firewood. Thank goodness a few also came back up stream with the help of oxen, man power or both by pulling the boats against the current by rope.

Château de la Malartrie dates back to the 12th Century. It was once a hospital for lepers, then in the 19th Century the Count of Saint-Aulaire, Ambassador of France in England had the Château transformed into the renaissance style that it is today.

Just lazing around on the river. Kayaks and canoes are also available so you can see the river at your own pace.

The largest gabarres were made of oak with strengthening rails along the sides. They had three or four masts and were about twenty metres in length, they could carry about thirty tons of merchandise: coffee, sugar, and citrus fruit were favourite.
 
 

Event:- Sarlat Truffle Festival and market on the 20th and 21st of this month. Not only truffles are sold you can buy truffle macaroons and other delicious cakes, cookies etc. Plus there will be cooking demonstrations by the top Chefs from the Perigord.
 
 

An English Themed Sarlat. Part One

On a very cold morning Paul and I decided to visit the Sarlat Village de Noël, well to be honest it was my idea, I just could not wait to see the forty chalets brimming with Christmas delights.

Arts and crafts from all over France descend on Sarlat this time of year selling everything that a person would need for the Christmas season. Lovers of gastronomy are not forgotten with gourmet products to eat on the spot or to take away.

If you would like something warming there are a few taverns selling hot mulled wine and chestnuts. Plus artisan beer, macaroons, and candies. There is also a large open air skating rink and numerous entertainments for the children.
 

Entrance to the Village de Noël.
 

A London black cab and on the right is Santa’s Grotto and elf workshop.
 

Union Flags are everywhere as you walk along the red carpet.
 

Pretzels or candy anyone?
 

Me outside Buckingham Place.
 

One way to attract the attention of British visitors to their lovely honey chalet.
 

Getting ready for the ice skaters.

Sarlat Village de Noël is open until the end of December.

Part Two will be in a few days time which will focus onto the main street and the Medieval Quarter of Sarlat.