Club de I’Amite Meal At Le Tourepique.

Yesterday was the Generations Movement, Club de I’Amite Daglanaise Autumn Meal. Where we all come together to enjoy each others convivial company while appreciating delicious food which is of course accompanied by a few glasses of wine.

At Le Tournepique restaurant in Castelnaud-la-Chapelle you can enjoy excellent Perigordian or Basque food. Or a taste of both. They have set menus or a selection of à la carte foods of a wide variety to tempt everyone’s palate. The Restaurant is situated on the bridge at Castlenaud overlooking the Dordogne River, below the Medieval Château.

We have eaten at Le Tournepique often and can highly recommend it for the excellent food and service. Not forgetting the terrific views of the River Dordogne. They also cater for Vegetarian or Gluten Free eaters.

Menu
For the Meat Eaters.
Kir
Soup Maison (pumpkin and chestnut soup deliciously spiced)
Terrine De Foie Gras
Roti De Veau sauce cepes with Pommes Sautees
Coupe De Glaces Aux Pommes (et Alcool De Pommes) – very delicious.
Cafe
Vins – Rouge ou Rose

For Vegetarian
Kir
Soup – same as above
Courgette salad with a gorgeous vinaigrette and walnuts dressing.
Fish cooked in a cream and white wine sauce encased in a delicious herb omelette.
Dessert – same as above
Cafe.
Vins – Rouge ou Rose.

Paul, enjoying the conversation while waiting for his soup course.
 

Looking good but where is George Clooney!
 

Bon Appétit Ladies.
 

Our Maire in deep conversation. I love the gentleman on the left facial expression and the witches hat in the background of the picture.
 

Wonderful seeing you looking so well Roy.
 

“Yours will be on the table in one minute”. Eyes down and enjoy.
 

Enjoying the alcoholic dessert. I must say thank you so much to our friend sitting beside me for being so patient in trying to teaching Paul and I to speak French over the Spring and Summer months.
 
 

Events:-
Halloween 31st October
All Saints Day 1st November
 
 

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“The Envy Of The Whole World”.

This is how President Emmanuel Macron described the French baguette earlier this year when he backed calls to have it listed as a UNESCO cultural treasure.

Intrigued and delighted by this, I just had to find out more information about the baguette, why that shape, how did it become so popular in every corner of France, in short what is the history of the tradition French Baguette.

Delicious.

 

Starting around the 14th and 15th century people had to use a Communal oven to bake their bread, which was mostly round in shape. However, even though they were called Communal they did not belong to the Community. The oven was the property of the local Lord or the Church who would charge the surfs for baking their bread. Following the French Revolution, the ovens became the property of the village; no more fees.

 

Once a week the oven was fired up and the locals would carry the dough they had prepared at home to the oven. Each family would mark the top of the bread with a distinctive cut to distinguish their bread from the other families.

 

The ash created during the baking was collected, mixed with water and used for the laundry.

Baguette’s really took off in the 1920’s after a new law prevented workers starting work before 4am. In older to get the bread baked in time for breakfast, bakers started to make long, thin ‘wand”s of bread. Although the dough at that time was still made at home and then taken to the Boulangerie to bake.

 

Bread oven’s can be seen all over France in the Boulangerie, or in the centre of the village, in the grounds of a property or in the property itself.

So if you are looking for a new home …

 
 

Event:-Le château de Castlenaud celebrates the European Heritage Weekend on the 15th and 16th September with a Medieval Fencing Tournament.
 
 

Food, Food, Glorious Food.

Everything on sale was to delight the senses at the Promenade en Gastronomie in Daglan village yesterday. From truffles, gateau, saucisson, escargots, to vegetables, fruit, candies and of course cheese and wine to name just a few of the delicacies on offer.

The View from our balcony.
 

I had to buy my Sunday treat of strawberries which are picked that morning by a local grower.
 

One simply cannot have enough garlic. I love the little dishes for garlic, oil and herbs.
 

One of the wine sellers with a sign that I totally agree with.
 

Once again we were unable to use our front door for the chicken and paella seller. The aroma drove the cats wild. We had to keep them away from the balcony in case they pulled in one of the chickens!
 

A gorgeous smile from Corrine selling various fresh baked breads and petite gateaux in front of the Boulangerie.
 

Always a teat to watch, the truffle dog who needed a little encouragement in the form of cheese snacks to find the truffles. I think citing the truffle hunting area next to the sausage stall could have something to do with the dogs inattention to his task.
 

 

Next Blog;-Dominique Allaert who is exhibiting his oil and watercolours in the Ancient Presbytere, plus a couple of interesting embroidery works.
 
 

There and back again.

Our regular Sunday morning consists of a trip to St Cyprien market with a stop in
Castelnaud-la-Chapelle for a picnic breakfast on the banks of the River Dordogne.

Last Sunday morning the Montgolfier’s were out in force, rising like smoke over the hills.

It must be such a brilliant view across the Ceou valley from the balloons. But not for me, I’m too afraid of heights to open my eyes and admire the vista of the country side below.
 

Arriving in the car park we noticed a new sculpture being worked.
 

Can just see the dog at its masters feet in front of the figure being sculpted.
 

The Summer bunting provides a little shade.
Spots everywhere, there are over 300,000 of these rosettes covering the streets of St Cyprien.
 

On our return I could not resist a sunflower picture.
The brilliant yellow always reminds me of watching the Tour de France on TV when I lived in England.
 
 

Enjoy the sunshine.

Next blog, the Grand Gastronomie market which will be in Daglan this Sunday.
 
 

Eyrignac Manor Garden

Not far from Sarlat are the gardens of Eyrignac Manor, where the French writer Gauthier de Costes de la Calprenede lived in the 17th Century. It is one of France’s most beautiful gardens and contains over 300 topiary sculptures and 50,000 yew, hornbeam, box and ivy plants and is well worth a visit.

Paul with our friends Hayley and Paul sitting in the shade of the Chinese Pagoda.

 

Manor d’Artaban.

 
It was Antoine de Costes de la Calprenede (1605-1689) councillor at the Presidential Court of Sarlat and appointed first Consul and defender of the town during the battles against royal power, who built the residence on the ruins of a former castle.
 

The Chapel and Dovecote.

 

Formally a smoke house for walnuts and grain.

 

The Washing Place.

 
Fed by one of the seven springs that flow through Eyrignac. It was built to accommodate six washing women. Who completed the laundry with the help from the neighbours twice a year!
 

The Florists Garden.

 
Flowers are cultivated for decoration in the Manor house.
 

Kitchen Garden with an unusual hedge of apple trees.

 

Our favourite the White Garden with its gorgeous frog fountains.

 

Superb private garden for the Manor House.

 
 

Event;- 29th July : not to be missed this Sunday, Daglan Gourmand.