M. Jacques Coudon

In Loving Memory of M. Jacques Coudon who died last Saturday at the age of ninety four.

Such a brilliant character he will be missed by the people of the village.

I will always have found memories of him walking his little dog Angus through the village.

Armistice Day

To Our War Hero, rest in peace.

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Demolition.

In France it is possible that the Marie can step in if a property is in a state of disarray (falling down). This happens more than people realise across the country. Due to the inheritance laws which date back to the Napoleon Years, on the death of the property owner the property must be divided equally between the children. So it is always a good idea to talk to your Notiare when buying a property who will give you advice on property inheritance.

For example should you want to leave the property to your wife or husband after your death it would still go to the children unless your wish is documented. Our Notiare studied our will and wishes regarding the the property which was to go to the surviving husband or wife and then on to the children after the survivors death, the principles of which were documented. In short always ask.

Splitting the property between children seems like a good idea until there is disagreement, say two want to sell and one does not. Until they reach an agreement the property is in limbo, the property just stays off the market for years, becomes derelict and in many cases starts to fall down. Which is what happened to the property close to us.

The Marie had to step in after the roof and the walls started to fall and crumble.
 

The colour of the stone is gorgeous.
 

It is now a nice area now that just needs a few plants, tables and chairs.

You can make out where the windows used to be and the outline of a doorway. I do hope that it is kept just like this it tells such a lot about the history of the house.
 
 

Event:-Sarlat Goose Festival 2nd and 3rd March. Not good for vegetarians so I am staying away.
 
 

Not long until July! Part One.

“Oh my goodness, summer is on the way, my exhibition in Daglan will soon be here.” At the moment I am not too nervous, just very excited. There are a few more pictures and cushions to be completed and I shall be ready for my exhibition.

Over the last few months several people have asked me various questions about my embroidery, “what is my plan”, “were do I start”, “when I am thinking of my next piece of embroidery work”. So here are a few suggestions which I hope will help anyone who is thinking about starting embroidering work.
 

Preparation

It might be best to try out a few small pieces of embroidery first, this you can do by looking at the various kits available in haberdashers and online which contain everything needed. Then if you get “the embroidery bug” you can move onto something more difficult.

1/ Planning. First, you will need, paper, pencil, fabric, embroidery silks, needle, wooden frame.

2/ Think about what the completed work is going to be e.g. a cushion, pillow case, a picture, embroidery to embellish a dress or shirt, or if you want to think big a tapestry. Not as large as the Bayeux tapestry… yet, although our son has suggested I embroider a tapestry of our family which would cover a wall of a large room!

3/ Consider fabrics. cotton, linen or canvas and what colour, it all depends on what you are going to make. I prefer plain white cotton for pictures and pillow cases and neutral coloured linen for cushions.

4/ I then sketch an outline of what I want my embroidery to look like onto paper so I can make alternations to the design at this stage. Think about the size of the picture and what colours of embroidery silks you will use. Remember that for a large area more than one silk is needed. All silks have a number on a paper ring around them so that if need more you can go back to the shop and buy the exact colour.

5/ When ready, measure your fabric two or three centimetres larger than a frame. Cut out the fabric. My preference is for a double layer of fabric which holds the stitches better without puckering.

6/ When pieces of linen or cotton are to be used they will be handled quite a lot so place a running stitch around the edge of the cut out fabric to stop it from frying so much.

7/ A good tip is to stretch the fabric. This is completed by placing the fabric into the frame as taut as possible, lightly spray the fabric with cold water and leave to dry.

8/ Sketch your design onto the fabric.

This is “Our French Dream”. Relaxing in a sunny garden with the produce of the Perigord on the table, wine, truffles and walnuts.
 

Begin you embroidery.
 

I added more flowers and one of our cats to the picture.
 

This is a butterfly that has just settled onto a flower.
 

The completed work is to be used in our poster for the exhibition.
 

9/ Use your imagination or research when creating a period piece. Or sketch a landscape or a château it is up to you, in order to create something unique.

10/ Most importantly, have Fun
 
 

Part Two will be our next blog-What stitches to use.
 
 

Club De L’Amitie Daglanaise.

An excellent first meal of the year was provided after the Club AGM yesterday, created by Chef Fabrice of La Cantine which is situated in Daglan village.

Of course it is not only the food which draws people, club business, projects, election of new committee members and it is a brilliant chance for a catch up with friends and a great opportunity to meet new people.


 

Excellent service, company, food and wine.
 

Bon Appetit.
 

My main course was a delicious vegetarian option. I must try and get the recipe from Fabrice.
 

The Three Musketeers.
 

Congratulations Elaine for your appointment to the Committee.
 

Presentation of flowers or a bottle of wine for Birthday celebrations.
 

Big hugs.
 

Gorgeous smiles. Look forward to our next meal together.
 
 

Event:-La Chandeleur will be celebrated on the 2nd February. It originates from an ancient Latin and Pagan festival. Later becoming the Christian celebration of Candlemas, bringing hope and warmth in the midst of Winter.

Traditionally in France It is when people make delicious crêpes for everyone to enjoy. You should hold a gold coin in one hand while flipping the crêpe in the pan with the other. If you succeed in flipping the crêpe, you will have a prosperous and fortunate year ahead.
 
 

Laissez vous Tenter.

Sarlat Truffle Festival 2019

They say the woods around Daglan
grow secrets in the ground,
and the Perigord Noir hide the rarest
of truffles to be found.

The truffle may be ugly,
found by pig or dog,
but everyone agrees
its flavour is to savor.

Hundreds of people were tightly packed around a marquee full of truffles in the Medieval Quarter of Sarlat last Saturday morning. After waiting a few minutes a loud sigh was heard from the gathered crowed as the side panels were removed from the marquee and each person breathed the amazing truffle aroma emanating from within.

And this is what it was for, Perigord Black Gold of every size and every price.
 

A close up. The truffles in the basket on the left were grade 1 priced at €900 per kilo.
 

There were also stalls selling delicious Street Food and with demonstrations of truffle based cuisine from Master Chefs.
 

We are very predictable, we looked for the truffle macaroons. Which are delicious. Just had to buy four, for testing purposes of course.
 

A first for us, truffle cheese. Which is rich and creamy with the distinctive flavour of truffle, I can highly recommend it.
 
 

Don’t miss Daglan’s Truffle Market which is open until February.