The Season Of Mist And Mellow Horses!

Since we moved to live in France we notice the seasons far more than we did in England. We used to live in a fairly large coastal town with little in the way of nature.

Here in Daglan nature is all around us and once again the seasonal changes in and around the village are magnificent. Autumn is here in full and colourful glory and with it come the mist’s of October mornings.

Taken from the graveyard overlooking Daglan as the mist rises to greet the sun over the forest.
 
Golden trees at the rear of the graveyard are just stunning.
 

These deep reds were photographed as Paul and I walked along the lane towards the river Ceou at the side of the Château.
 

The forest in all its glory.
 

I could not believe my eyes, crocuses in bloom!
 

I Just had to stop for a chat.
 

Or two. So gentle and relaxed, magnificent horses. Just what I needed to ease a stressful day.
 

The Château grounds as the sun slowly penetrates through the trees early yesterday morning.
 
 

Event:-Sarlat 21st October, Grande Brocante d’automne. Place de la Grande Rigaudie from eight in the morning.
 
 

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“The Envy Of The Whole World”.

This is how President Emmanuel Macron described the French baguette earlier this year when he backed calls to have it listed as a UNESCO cultural treasure.

Intrigued and delighted by this, I just had to find out more information about the baguette, why that shape, how did it become so popular in every corner of France, in short what is the history of the tradition French Baguette.

Delicious.

 

Starting around the 14th and 15th century people had to use a Communal oven to bake their bread, which was mostly round in shape. However, even though they were called Communal they did not belong to the Community. The oven was the property of the local Lord or the Church who would charge the surfs for baking their bread. Following the French Revolution, the ovens became the property of the village; no more fees.

 

Once a week the oven was fired up and the locals would carry the dough they had prepared at home to the oven. Each family would mark the top of the bread with a distinctive cut to distinguish their bread from the other families.

 

The ash created during the baking was collected, mixed with water and used for the laundry.

Baguette’s really took off in the 1920’s after a new law prevented workers starting work before 4am. In older to get the bread baked in time for breakfast, bakers started to make long, thin ‘wand”s of bread. Although the dough at that time was still made at home and then taken to the Boulangerie to bake.

 

Bread oven’s can be seen all over France in the Boulangerie, or in the centre of the village, in the grounds of a property or in the property itself.

So if you are looking for a new home …

 
 

Event:-Le château de Castlenaud celebrates the European Heritage Weekend on the 15th and 16th September with a Medieval Fencing Tournament.
 
 

Le Château De Monbazillac Part Two.

Fist of all, Bravo Les Bleus. I do not usually watch football but I, like millions of others, just had to watch this match.

Wow… you are so awesome.

 

O.K back to Monbazillac.

There is a very interesting room in the Château called Mounet-Sully room. There is only a brief explanation of the person so I just had to find out more. Mounet-Sully (birth name Jean-Sully Mounet was born in 1841 in Bergerac) and he became a famous actor, painter, sculptor and writer. He was a member of the celebrated Comedie Francaise, as was his brother Paul.

His most famous role as an actor was that of Oedipus in L’Oedipe, a French version by Jules Lacroix. He was made Chevalier of the Legion of Honour in 1889.

A little bit of scandal, his brother Paul was famous not only for his acting but for his affair with Sarah Bernhardt. Who’s picture you can see on the table in the room.

Mounet-Sully caricatures.

 
In the tower room is a gorgeous collection of white porcelain from Limoges which also belonged to Mounet-Sully.
 

The Bedroom of the Viscountess.

A Reconstruction of a lady’s bedroom in the 17th Century.

 

Next to the bedroom is a wonderful room filled with sketches of Ladies fashions from the Edwardian period. I particularly liked this sketch above, the costume looks so elegant and stylish.
 

We had a sneaky peek into this room which is being restored to its former glory.
 
 

Events:-

Saint-Pompon Night market open every Saturday until 18th August.

Celtic night in the village of Saint Andre d’Allas on 21st July.
 

All I need is a Château!

A Brocante in Daglan village always draws in the crowds from far and wide. Paul and I were there early in search of a bargain or two. We are still looking for a wardrobe for the guest bedroom and a chair for the veranda. But sadly we could not find what we were after. However, the following are just a few of my favourite things that I loved in this years Brocante.

Ne Pas Toucher. I just wanted to have one small touch.
 

Paul and a neighbour. “I love that painting, and the china dishes”.
 

Superb selection of just about everything was to be found over the weekend period.
 

Somehow I have a magnet that always draws me to the vintage linen stall.
 

Now these bed warmers would be handy for next Winter.
 

All I need now is a Château to go with the spinning wheels.
 

Think CSI Las Vagus and the miniature serial killer – or is it just me. Where is the miniature body? For anyone who did not see this series of CSI Las Vegas, a miniature model of the room that murder was in to be committed was cratered by the murder in such fine detail that it was an exact copy of the room were the body would be found.
 
 

Upcoming changes to the opening hours of our village 8 à Huit Supermarket. Summer is nearly here.
 
 

Fête Du Printemps in Daglan

I love this time of year “Spring is upon us”, it is still so cold but we were out this morning buying lots of gorgeous plants from the Daglan Fête Du Printemps. There was so much to choose from, with many stalls which filled the square in front of our home in the Place Du Liberty and continued all the way along the Rue de la Republique.

There were also local authors signing their books in Salon Du Livre in the Presbyter, a children’s area in the local Primary School and Poulet au Pot Farcie at the Salle Du Fête.

People were loading up their cars with plants this morning.
 

Paul buying a Muscat vine.
 

Fabrice Le Cafe, selling oysters with champagne or wine outside his restaurant this morning. Love the beard Fabrice, it suits you.
 

A selection of garden furniture and hand painted ornaments from Le Jardin de Rosa. Her shop is to be found at the back of the Château Beynac.
 

Our own château in Daglan village (I wish) with gorgeous fruit plants and shrubs at the front of the gate.
 

A gorgeous display of colour.
 

Two of our wonderful friends.
 

Saving the best till last, Daglan village proudly shows its two Fleuri, well done.