The Last Duel

Last week as we drove through Beynac there were various signs to indicate something big was happening. Bright yellow signs were posted everywhere directing to “Crew Parking”, “Technicians parking”, “Caravan parking” and the give away “Set”.

We have now learned what it was all about from The Connexion newspaper

Below is an extract from their article explaining all…
 


Hollywood movie stars come to small French town

Local restaurant La Couleverine posted a tweet thanking Matt Damon for visiting, and the actor appeared happy to pose for photos.
 

The Dordogne has welcomed Hollywood stars Matt Damon, Ben Affleck and Adam Driver – plus director Ridley Scott – as they film their latest blockbuster in the small town of Sarlat-la-Canéda.

The team of 800 technicians and 800 actors are filming The Last Duel in the Nouvelle-Aquitaine town, including at the Château de Beynac. They have also been based in the 15,000m2 warehouses of tobacco company France Tabac.

This is the biggest film production to have taken place in the town, which has previously been the site of movies such as Les Visiteurs 2 and Jeanne d’Arc.

Set for release in 2021, the movie is about “the last duel” to have been organised in France, said to have been between the Carrouges Knight and a squire, in the year 1386.
 

Read more at The Connexion, the English-language website all about France.
 
 

Baynac Bypass News…

The Bordeaux appeal court has upheld a decision to stop construction of a bypass around Beynac et Cazenac that passed through an area of great natural beauty.

People have campaigned long and hard for this result, stating that it would be an environmental disaster taking a major road through one of France’s Unesco biosphere reserves.

Work was suspended a year ago following the Conseil d’Etat request for further review. Dordogne departmental council appealed but the decision was upheld with instructions that the site must be returned to its original state within a year.

This comes two years after the Dordogne prefecture approved the thirty two million bypass, half of which has already been spent. Dordogne departmental council intend to appeal to a higher court and request that the demolition of the work already done be put on hold pending further appeal.

Baynac.
 

Part of the construction already undertaken.
 

The pillars for the bridge were nearly completed when construction had to stop.
 

A lot of work is needed to return the above to its natural state. I am thinking more than a year but I could be wrong.
 
 

Why the Perigord Noir?

This question has been asked by friends, family, tourists and house hunters. The appeal to us, is that this part of the Perigord offers the most stunning landscapes as the Dordogne River cuts through the unspoiled countryside. The landscape changes at every bend in the road and there are amazing sights as you drive past the villages clinging to the rock face.

La Roque-Gageac.
 

There are four distinctive seasons from short Winters where temperatures can reach below freezing (-7 this morning) to blooming Spring and gorgeous hot Summers. Which are reflected in the seasonal produce sold in the many markets of the area.

The cuisine is rich in its diversity from duck, mushrooms, truffles, cheeses, wine, fruit and vegetables. To match this there are the amazing food festivals. this month we see the truffle market in Daglan and the Truffle Festival in Sarlat. Summertime brings the night markets where you can enjoy fresh cooked local food in pleasant surroundings.

Historical features include the many Château’s featuring pigeonniers and of course the many wonderful Beaux villages of the area.

A taster for the first time visitor to this area are Milandes, Castlenaud, Beynac, La Roque-Gageac, Domme, Daglan and Sarlat.

Medieval weekend last Summer held at Château de Castelnaud.
 

Included sword fighting demonstrations.
 

La Mairie de Daglan, Such a beautiful building.
 

Le Tour de Daglan takes a short rest in the village square.
 

Most of all it is always the people that make a place worth visiting time and again, and Daglan is no exception to this rule. You will never meet more friendly and welcoming people who are always willing to help and to make your life here a little bit better by their presence.

The weekly Craft Session.
 
 

Water, water everywhere, nor any drop to drink.

–Samuel Taylor Coleridge
 

We two have paddled in the stream, from morning sun till dine;
But seas between us broad have roared since days of long ago.

–Robert Burns.
 

Parking Reserved card holders and Residents was an odd sight on a sign in what is left of a camp site in Beynac yesterday.
 

The swelling of the Dordogne River was at its peak yesterday morning.
 

The trees on the left should be on dry land.
 

The terrace of this restaurant was under more than a metre of water.
 

D53 Route Barrie to Fayrac and Milandes and also the D703 to La Roque-Gageac.
 

Update on the water level at Castlenaud.
 

The statue stands in what is usually a very pleasant picnic area which is temporarily a tranquil lake.
 

It does not look too good at the moment with more rain due this afternoon and for the rest of the week. However, spring is just around the corner, we have new growth in our courtyard and flowers will be bursting through soon.
 
 

Event:- Burns Night- 25th January, where haggis is eaten and whiskey is drunk to honour a brilliant Scottish poet.
 
 

Stop! You need a canoe.

We traveled to Castelnaud-la-Chapelle this morning then on to Beynac before returning home through Vitrac Port and Cenac checking out the roads and fields. Our findings were that quite a number of fields are under water and a few roads are closed.

The D53 between St Cybranet through to Cenac is closed.

The D53 from Castelnaud la Chapelle to Les Milandes is closed.

The D703 leading from Vitrac Port to Montford is closed.

The picnic area by the banks of the Dordogne river at Castelnaud la Chapelle this morning. We have never seen the Dordogne water level so high covering all of the picnic area and the embankment.
 

Looking at Castlenaud from across the river. The treeline in the middle of the river is usually where the banks are.
 

This is where we like to picnic on the shore at Beynac. Today no land was to be seen it is completely water logged.
 

The boats above were on dry land last week.